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It’s going to be a warm one... πŸ₯΅HNE Health is urging people to take necessary precautions with heatwave conditions forecast for parts of the region this weekend.

People are urged to take extra precautions as temperatures are expected to climb into the high 30s or mid-40s across much of NSW in the next few days.

Simple precautions can reduce the risk of heat-related illness:

β€’ avoid the heat of the day by staying indoors and keeping cool by using air-conditioning, fans and drawing blinds and curtains closed
β€’ keep hydrated by drinking plenty of water
β€’ check on the welfare of vulnerable neighbours, friends and family
β€’ plan ahead for hot days.

For more information, visit www.health.nsw.gov.au/environment/beattheheat/Pages/default.aspx

#BeatTheHeat
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It’s going to be a warm one... πŸ₯΅

"The latest research, a 2019 JAMA Internal Medicine study found that every extra 10 primary care physicians – the US equivalent of GPs – per 100,000 population is associated with a 51.5 day increase in life expectancy, and an up to 1.4% decline in deaths from common causes like cancer and heart disease.

The epidemiological study also found that the same increase in specialist doctors led to only a 19.2 day increase in life expectancy.

It follows the much-cited 2007 Macinko, Starfield and Shi meta-analysis of 17 studies that examined links between primary care physician numbers and health outcomes, which found that each additional primary care doctor per 10,000 population was associated with an average mortality decline of 5.3%."

www1.racgp.org.au/newsgp/clinical/primary-care-really-does-make-you-live-longer-stud
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The latest research, a 2019 JAMA Internal Medicine study found that every extra 10 primary care physicians – the US equivalent of GPs – per 100,000 population is associated with a 51.5 day increase in life expectancy, and an up to 1.4% decline in deaths from common causes like cancer and heart disease.
 
The epidemiological study also found that the same increase in specialist doctors led to only a 19.2 day increase in life expectancy.
 
It follows the much-cited 2007 Macinko, Starfield and Shi meta-analysis of 17 studies that examined links between primary care physician numbers and health outcomes, which found that each additional primary care doctor per 10,000 population was associated with an average mortality decline of 5.3%.

https://www1.racgp.org.au/newsgp/clinical/primary-care-really-does-make-you-live-longer-stud

Happy Thursdays - Keeping Kids Safe!
Young children curiously want to explore the world but unaware of the potential dangers. The NSW Poisons Information Centre offers the following tips:

πŸ‘¨β€πŸ‘©β€πŸ‘¦ Closely supervise children around the home
🍫 Don't call medicines 'lollies'. When giving medicine to children, always follow the instructions on the label
πŸ‘ΆπŸ» Buy products in child resistant containers but remember that the lids are not completely child-proof - a curious and determined child may eventually open these containers. Always make sure that the child-resistant lid is on properly after each use
☠️ Store all poisons including medicines, cleaning products and chemicals in their original containers that are clearly labelled. Return medicines and poisons to their safe storage area immediately after use. Do not leave them out on a bench or counter
🍼 Do NOT decant liquid chemicals into drink bottles
Place containers in a child-resistant locked cupboard that is at least 1.5 metres above the ground
πŸ‘œ Keep handbags out of a child's reach if storing medicine or other poisons in your handbag
πŸ• Be extra vigilant when normal family routine is changed, e.g going on holidays, moving house, having visitors who are on medications
πŸ”‹ Beware the button battery which can be lethal if swallowed

www.poisonsinfo.nsw.gov.au/
... See MoreSee Less

Happy Thursdays - Keeping Kids Safe!
Young children curiously want to explore the world but unaware of the potential dangers. The NSW Poisons Information Centre offers the following tips:

πŸ‘¨β€πŸ‘©β€πŸ‘¦ Closely supervise children around the home
🍫 Dont call medicines lollies. When giving medicine to children, always follow the instructions on the label
πŸ‘ΆπŸ» Buy products in child resistant containers but remember that the lids are not completely child-proof - a curious and determined child may eventually open these containers. Always make sure that the child-resistant lid is on properly after each use 
☠️ Store all poisons including medicines, cleaning products and chemicals in their original containers that are clearly labelled. Return  medicines and poisons to their safe storage area immediately after use. Do not leave them out on a bench or counter
🍼 Do NOT decant liquid chemicals into drink bottles
Place containers in a child-resistant locked cupboard that is at least 1.5 metres above the ground
πŸ‘œ Keep handbags out of a childs reach if storing medicine or other poisons in your handbag
πŸ• Be extra vigilant when normal family routine is changed, e.g going on holidays, moving house, having visitors who are on medications
πŸ”‹ Beware the button battery which can be lethal if swallowed

https://www.poisonsinfo.nsw.gov.au/

Fried. Poached. Scrambled. Omelets. Frittatas. Soft boiled. Hard boiled. Baked. Eggs so many ways it's hard to keep up.

The national centre for immunisation research and surveillance has some handy info for those with egg allergies.

www.ncirs.org.au/sites/default/files/2018-12/vaccines-asthma-allergies-fact-sheet.pdf?fbclid=IwAR...
... See MoreSee Less

Fried. Poached. Scrambled. Omelets. Frittatas. Soft boiled. Hard boiled. Baked. Eggs so many ways its hard to keep up. 

The national centre for immunisation research and surveillance has some handy info for those with egg allergies. 

https://www.ncirs.org.au/sites/default/files/2018-12/vaccines-asthma-allergies-fact-sheet.pdf?fbclid=IwAR0PRqC3bompZuN4jqri_-CS4Ox5RF9BASwloTIkxsCcIBO-ZqYgBvF22ug

All the little things add up. Over the last 50 years significant efforts have been made to improve the death toll on our roads. Safer cars, improved road design, and most importantly better educated drivers have added up to improved health and wellbeing for our community. Let’s not take it for granted. Drive safe. πŸš—It's World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims, and we're taking a look at how road safety interventions have significantly reduced the road toll over the last four decades. ... See MoreSee Less

All the little things add up. Over the last 50 years significant efforts have been made to improve the death toll on our roads. Safer cars, improved road design, and most importantly better educated drivers have added up to improved health and wellbeing for our community. Let’s not take it for granted. Drive safe. πŸš—
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